It is an axiom of politics that everybody has dirt on everybody. It is expedient to hold onto this dirt as one would an ace up one’s sleeve, to play the card when it is most advantageous.

If your political opponents view your removal as crucial to the achievement of a policy goal, rest assured they’re going to play their ace.

The Australian Greens oppose the so-called “voice to parliament” basically because they think that with a Labor government in power they can get more – a formal treaty or something, and Lidia Thorpe is a pivotal decision maker regarding this policy:

Ms Thorpe has previously said a treaty between Indigenous Australians and the federal government was needed, as a party spokesperson confirmed the meeting occurred.

“This meeting of Senate Crossbenchers with a number of stakeholders was to discuss the importance of progressing the United Nations Declaration of Rights of Indigenous Peoples,” a Greens spokesperson said in a statement.

They’re getting greedy.

Aboriginal identity politics activists have for decades achieved practically every policy goal toward which they have directed the energy of their fanatical supporters by utilising pragmatism and incrementalism. They always try to make their crazy demands sound like small, reasonable changes and the last thing they will ask for, after which we will enter a new era of mutual understanding.

In strides the black power saluting, designer suit wearing, slut tattoo brandishing Lidia Thorpe, openly stating that she views herself as an infiltrator of a parliament she considers illegitimate, to the point that she mocks the oath undertaken to enter its service.

Despite the hubris she isn’t any more radical than the pragmatists. They all hate Australia and Australians. It’s just that some aboriginal identity politics activists work to systematically dismantle Australia, while others want to burn it all down in one go.

Hence the dilemma for the old hands who thought that a couple of years’ worth of sustained pressure could give them control over a third chamber of parliament and ultimately the entire Australian parliament. They need all hands on deck pulling in the same direction, as considerable opposition is mounting against the so-called “voice”.

Thorpe’s antics don’t merely turn one of their most important allies – the Greens – into an opponent; they risk provoking a reaction from the Australian masses which could set back the project to dismantle Australia by decades.

Thus the importance of dirt.

Yes, I am pointing the finger at Marcia Langton. I don’t care one way or another, it is what it is. On Friday as the story broke, the ABC gave her prominent airtime in order to press home the attack on Lidia Thorpe:

I think the portfolio should be taken away from her.

I have to draw the conclusion she does not have the judgement to handle the Indigenous affairs portfolio which anyone must surely understand consists of a range of extremely complex matters such as Closing the Gap, the referendum on the Voice and so many other issues.

I would like the Greens to totally ditch their present set of policies which look like they were written on the back of a bar tab and seem to amount to about $7m for reparations. There are no policies as such. The resistance to the Voice that the Greens have shown, taking Senator Thorpe’s lead, has been a nonsense and destructive…

They have chosen a person with apparently no common sense or an inability to understand the rules and a willingness to break the rules. I despair that because people like Adam Bandt must surely be thinking or perhaps trying to give the impression that all Aboriginal people are like Senator Thorpe and that’s simply not the case.

It is curious that not only did the ABC choose to break the story, they made a point of platforming Langton when the story was at the peak of the news cycle. Surveys indicate that the ABC is crawling with Greens supporters, which allows the Greens minnow to punch well above its weight in Australian politics and has allowed the inner city extreme left to wield immense cultural power.

Therefore I argue that in breaking the story, ABC apparatchiks aimed to influence Greens party policy, namely in pressuring the Greens to reverse their opposition to the so-called “voice to parliament”.

Returning finally to my opening paragraphs, this provides an opportunity to broaden the attack on Lidia Thorpe and the Greens. I suspect that Adam Bandt, multiple Greens senators and staffers, and multiple far left journalists knew Lidia was shagging a bikie.

They all kept it quiet, even though they understood the massive conflict of interest due to Thorpe’s sitting on a federal parliament law enforcement committee which had access to classified material.

They chose to make the information public when it was politically expedient, but in doing so they have potentially implicated multiple powerful figures on the far left of Australian politics in a cover up of national significance.

This article was first published in xyz.net.au

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